Final Award in Quick Composing TT-182 | Окончательные итоги блицконкурса TT-182

Cross-checks by Bishop battery | Перекрестные шахи слоновой батареи

Theme | Тема

32 entries were received from 17 authors representing 11 countries | На конкурс поступило 32 композиций от 17 авторов из 11 стран

EN <-> RU

Editorial. After a publication of provisional award, a conflict situation arose between the initial judge (which prepared this award) and TT Director Aleksey Oganesjan concerning one problem. The initial judge asked to remove his name in a final award for some reasons. Satisfying this request and guided by "REGULATIONS in TT" (in Russian), the TT Director independently processed all sent notes and prepared the final award taking into account these notes (distinctions of all problems remained without changes, just only the improved versions of four problems were added). That’s why Aleksey Oganesjan is considered the judge of this TT.


I have received 32 (!) entries, without composer names. I want to thank all participants and congratulate the composers of the honoured problems.
There was a question about the “preferred” optional requirement: a try with a “not-too-bad” refutation. This is simply a requirement from the view of a (potential) solver – a #2 does not convince him if the key is obviously the only way for White to make progress.
There were also doubts: if still anything new could be composed in this field? Although I can, of course, not be 100% sure, I am as sure as I can that at least each prize shows something really new!

I excluded from judge report all problems with:
- wK in check: No 12 (Kb2-Kd4), No 13A* (Kb4-Ka6), No 13B* (Kb4-Ka6), No 13C* (Kb3-Ka6);
- more than one threat if only 3 thematic variations: No 8 (Kb5-Ke5), No 17 (Ke8-Kd4), No 18 (Kf1-Kg3), No 25 (Kb4-Ke3), No 26 (Kb5-Kd4);
- battery-creating key: No 14 (Ka5-Kc7), No 19 (Kb6-Ke6);
This judge report alone proves that there was no need to use such drastic methods.

I also excluded the following five entries:
- No 1 (Ke1-Kf5) and No 24 (Ka3-Kc3) show similar matrices, without an acceptable try they are too heavy;
- No 3 (Kc6-Kf5) shows no significant improvement on anticipation A (see Appendix);
- No 4 (Kh6-Kd7) because No 9 (6th Prize) proves that this is too heavy and also better tries are possible;
- No 5 (Kd3-Ke5) shows no significant improvement on anticipation B (see Appendix).

Award is the following | Отличия распределились следующим образом

1st Prize, 1st Place - No 31 (version)
Michel Caillaud & Valery Shanshin
TT-182, SuperProblem, 03-02-2017
4R2q/2Q1Bn2/4kNP1/K6p/4P3/3n4/8/8
#2(7+5)
2nd Prize, 2nd Place - No 29
Michel Caillaud
TT-182, SuperProblem, 24-01-2017
7r/b6R/8/q4P1P/3P1Q2/2RB3k/1P4p1/3K4
#2(9+5)
3rd Prize, 3rd Place - No 16
Valery Shanshin
TT-182, SuperProblem, 24-01-2017
1N4B1/pN1R4/K2Br2p/p2kq1bR/2r2P2/1Q1b1P2/2P3p1/8
#2(11+10)

1st Prize, 1st Place - No 31 (version), Michel Caillaud (France) & Valery Shanshin (Russia) 4R2q/2Q1Bn2/4kNP1/K6p/4P3/3n4/8/8

1.S~? – 2.Bf8#, 1...Qxe8! (a)
1.Sg8? – 2.B~#, 1...Qxg8!
1.Sxh5! – 2.Bf8#, 1...Qa1+ 2.Ba3#, 1...Qc3+ 2.Bb4#, 1...Qe5+ 2.Bc5#, 1...Qxh5+ 2.Bg5#
1...Qxe8 (a) 2.Sg7#, 1...Qf6 2.Bxf6#, 1...Sd6 2.Qxd6#
Four thematic variations as duel bQ-wB, all four checks given by the key, with only 12 pieces – possible because of the ingenious separation of Qe5+ & Qxh5+. Also there is a White correction. Never there was a doubt that this would be the 1st Prize!
EN <-> RU

2nd Prize, 2nd Place - No 29, Michel Caillaud (France) 7r/b6R/8/q4P1P/3P1Q2/2RB3k/1P4p1/3K4

1.Rg7? – 2.Qg3#, 1...Qa1+ 2.Bb1#, 1...Qa4+ 2.Bc2#, 1...g1Q(R)+ 2.Bf1#,
1...Qe5 2.Be4#, 1...Qc7 2.Bc4#
1...Bb8!
1.f6! – 2.Bf5#, 1...Qa1+ 2.Bb1#, 1...Qa4+ 2.Bc2#, 1...Qxh5+ 2.Be2#, 1...g1Q(R)+ 2.Bf1#
Also four thematic variations in a light setting, but the key gives only 1 additional check, and a pinned piece in this variation is easier to handle, thus this is slightly inferior to the 1st prize. Note the formal wB-star over set-generating try and solution.
EN <-> RU

3rd Prize, 3rd Place - No 16, Valery Shanshin (Russia) 1N4B1/pN1R4/K2Br2p/p2kq1bR/2r2P2/1Q1b1P2/2P3p1/8

*1...Qxd6+ 2.Rxd6#, *1...Kd4 2.Qxd3#
1.Kxa7? – 2.Bxe5#, 1...Qd4+ 2.Bc5#, 1...g1Q(B)+!
1.Kb5? – 2.Bxe5#, 1...Kd4+ 2.Bc5#, 1...a6+!
1.Kxa5! – 2.Bxe5#, 1...Qa1+ 2.Ba3#, 1...Qc3/Qe1+ 2.Bb4#, 1...Kd4+ 2.Bc5#, 1...Bd8+ 2.Bc7#
1...Qg7/Be7 2.B(x)e7#, 1...Qxf4 2.Bxf4#
Heavy construction in a matrix where a try with a not-too-bad refutation seems impossible to add. But this problem shows also four thematic variations.
EN <-> RU
4th Prize - No 28
Ivo Tominić
TT-182, SuperProblem, 24-01-2017
5Q2/2n1p3/2N5/3N1p2/r3k2K/4Bp2/n2R1PB1/q3R3
#2vvv(9+8)
5th Prize - No 30
Michel Caillaud
TT-182, SuperProblem, 24-01-2017
8/2K5/2N5/1N2R1P1/p1k1BR1r/pq2p3/P1r5/1Q6
#2(9+7)
6th Prize - No 9 (version)
Dieter Müller
TT-182, SuperProblem, 03-02-2017
q7/2p5/2Rp4/6Bp/2Bp1K2/2kP1N2/8/nQ6
#2(7+7)

4th Prize - No 28, Ivo Tominić (Croatia) 5Q2/2n1p3/2N5/3N1p2/r3k2K/4Bp2/n2R1PB1/q3R3

*1...Qf6+ 2.Bg5#, *1...Qh8+ 2.Bh6#, *1...f4 2.Qxf4#, *1...e5 2.Sf6#, *1...fxg2/Qd4/Rd4 2.??
1.Kg3? – 2.Bxf3#, 1...Qe5+ (a) 2.Bf4# (A), 1...Qg7+ (b) 2.Bg5# (B), 1...f4+ 2.Qxf4#, 1...fxg2 2.f3#, 1...Qd1!
1.Bh3? – 2.Qxf5#/Bxf5#, 1...Qh8+ 2.Bh6#, 1...Qd4/Rd4 2.Qxf5#, 1...Qf6+ 2.Bg5#, 1...e6!
1.Sdxe7? – 2.Qxf5#, 1...Qh8+ 2.Bh6#, 1...Qf6+ 2.Bg5#, 1...Qe5 2.Bh6#/Bg5#, 1...Ra5!
1.Scxe7! – 2.Qxf5#, 1...Ke5+ (c) 2.Bf4# (A), 1...Qf6+ (d) 2.Bg5# (B), 1...Qh8+ 2.Bh6#
Clearly the best entry with only three thematic variations. It heavily emphasizes on tries, 2 transferred mates from 1.Kg3? (also on black checks!), and there is a white correction (in a wider sense) on “basic attack” 1.Bh3?: 1.Sdxe7!? opens 5th rank what leads to refutation, 1.Scxe7! gives a flight what turns out being without danger.
EN <-> RU

5th Prize - No 30, Michel Caillaud (France) 8/2K5/2N5/1N2R1P1/p1k1BR1r/pq2p3/P1r5/1Q6

*1...Rh7+ 2.Bxh7#, *1...Qc3 2.Sd6#, *1...Qxb5 2.Qxc2#
1.Qd1? – 2.Bd3#/Qd5#/Qd4#, 1...Rh7+ 2.Bxh7#, 1...Rd2!
1.Rxh4? – 2.Bxc2#/Bh7#/Bg6#/Bf5#, 1...Qc3 2.Sd6#, 1...Qb2!
1.Kb6? – 2.Rc5#, 1...Qb4 2.Qxb4#, 1...Qxb5+!
1.Kd6! – 2.Rc5#, 1...Rh6+ 2.Bg6#, 1...Rd2+ 2.Bd3#, 1...Qd3+ 2.Bd5#
1...Qb4+ 2.Qxb4#, 1...Qxb5 2.Qxc2#
Unusual separation of two double-check mates.
EN <-> RU

6th Prize - No 9 (version), Dieter Müller (Germany) q7/2p5/2Rp4/6Bp/2Bp1K2/2kP1N2/8/nQ6

*1...Qf8+ 2.Bf7#
1.Bh4? – 2.Bf1#, 1...Qe8!
1.Bf6? – 2.Bxd4#, 1...Qf8/Qh8 2.B~#, 1...Qa7!
1.Kg3? – 2.Bd2#, 1...Qg8 2.Bd5/Be6/Bf7/Bxg8#, 1...h4+!
1.Kf5! – 2.Bd2#, 1...Qa5+ 2.Bb5#, 1...Qc8+ 2.Be6#, 1...Qf8+ 2.Bf7#
1...Qa2 2.Bxa2#, 1...Sb3 2.Qxb3#
Duel bQ-wB in a light position with good option tries (1.Bh4? & 1.Bf6?).
EN <-> RU
7th Prize - No 27
Aleksandr Kostyukov
TT-182, SuperProblem, 24-01-2017
5R2/p3KB2/r1P1R1P1/2p1B1p1/2PPkPPq/b2p1p1p/1r1P4/Q7
#2(13+11)
1st Hon. mention - No 15 (version)
Valery Shanshin
TT-182, SuperProblem, 03-02-2017
2q5/p2b1N2/1r1R4/PPkBR2r/p5p1/P1K1N3/8/4Q3
#2(10+8)
2nd Honorable mention - No 7
Pavel Murashev
TT-182, SuperProblem, 24-01-2017
3K4/8/1p1R2PB/qR1B1k2/1p1P2r1/5r1P/3P2Qn/6n1
#2(10+8)

7th Prize - No 27, Aleksandr Kostyukov (Russia) 5R2/p3KB2/r1P1R1P1/2p1B1p1/2PPkPPq/b2p1p1p/1r1P4/Q7

*1...Rb7+ 2.Bc7#, *1...cxd4+ 2.Bd6#, *1...gxf4+ 2.Bf6#, *1...Qxg4 2.??
1.g7? – 2.Bg6#, 1...Rb7+ 2.Bc7#, 1...gxf4+ 2.Bf6#, 1...cxd4+ 2.Bd6#,
1...f2 2.Qh1#, 1...Qh7/Qh6/Qh5 2.Qe1#,
1...Qxg4!
1.Be8! – 2.Bh8#/Bg7#, 1...Rb7+ 2.Bc7#, 1...cxd4+ 2.Bd6#, 1...gxf4+ 2.Bf6#, 1...Qh7+ 2.Bg7#
1...f2 2.Qh1#, 1...Qxg4 2.Qe1#, 1...Rxc6 2.Bxc6#
1.Bg8? Rxc6!
Four thematic variations with a very good option try (1.Bg8?). Despite the full board, this would have been placed higher if the double-threat could have been avoided. (It is easy to prove that the double-threat is not necessary, because you can simply add +wSh8 – but, of course, no composer would think about that...)
EN <-> RU

1st Honorable mention - No 15 (version), Valery Shanshin (Russia) 2q5/p2b1N2/1r1R4/PPkBR2r/p5p1/P1K1N3/8/4Q3

*1...Kxb5+ 2.Bc4#
1.Qb1? – 2.Qb4#, 1...Rxb5! (a)
1.Qe2/Qf1? – 2.Qc4#, 1...Bxb5!
1.Kc2! – 2.Qb4#, 1...Kxb5+ 2.Bc4#, 1...Bf5+ 2.Be4#, 1...Rh2+ 2.Bg2#
1...Kd4+ 2.Bc6#, 1...Rxb5 (a) 2.Qc3#
C (see Appendix) is a partial forerunner (mentioned by the composer), but option try and flight-giving key are major improvements. (Note that 1...Kd4+ is a 4th main variation, but not in this tourney.)
EN <-> RU

2nd Honorable mention - No 7, Pavel Murashev (Russia) 3K4/8/1p1R2PB/qR1B1k2/1p1P2r1/5r1P/3P2Qn/6n1

*1...Qa8+ 2.Bxa8#, *1... Re4 (a) / Rxd4 / Rg5 2.Q(x)g5#
1.d3? – 2.Be4# (A), 1...Qa8+ 2.Bxa8#, 1...Rg5 2.Qxg5#, 1...Qxb5!
1.Ke7! – 2.Rf6#, 1...Qa7+ 2.Bb7#, 1...Re3+ 2.Be4# (A), 1...Re4+ (a) 2.Be6#
(1... Rxd4 2.Qg5#, 1...Rxg6 2.Qxg6#)
Worse version of No. 30 (5th Prize): two pieces more, and only one try, with an almost obvious refutation. (A better try could have been added by +wPh4: 1.Bg5? Rxd4!, but No 30 remains superior.)
EN <-> RU
3rd Honorable mention - No 32
Emanuel Navon
TT-182, SuperProblem, 24-01-2017
3k1b2/1Rp1pP2/n3BP2/K1R5/3BP3/3Q2q1/8/8
#2(9+6)
4th Honorable mention - No 21
Alberto Armeni
TT-182, SuperProblem, 24-01-2017
3q4/8/n3P2p/3QB2k/7P/3p2RR/5KPN/4n3
#2(9+6)
5th Honorable mention - No 23
Ingemar Lind
TT-182, SuperProblem, 24-01-2017
bQ4q1/3P4/1P2RP2/RP1PBp2/1K2kP2/1B1p4/2NP3N/8
#2(15+5)

3rd Honorable mention - No 32, Emanuel Navon (Israel) 3k1b2/1Rp1pP2/n3BP2/K1R5/3BP3/3Q2q1/8/8

*1...exf6 2.Bxf6#, *1...Qe1+ 2.Bc3#, *1...Qxd3 2.Rd5#
1.Re5? – 2.Be3#, 1...Qxd3 2.Rd5#, 1...Qe1+ 2.Bc3#, 1...Qxe5+ 2.Bxe5#, 1...S~ 2.Rb8# (A), 1...exf6!
1.Rcxc7! – 2.Rc8#, 1...Qg5+ 2.Be5#, 1...Qxc7+ 2.Bb6#, 1...Qe1+ 2.Bc3#
1...Sxc7 2.Rb8# (A), 1...Qg5+ 2.Bxe5#
Duel bQ-wB with wB-moves into three different directions, and with a good try. But without the elegance of e.g. 6th Prize.
EN <-> RU

4th Honorable mention - No 21, Alberto Armeni (Italy) 3q4/8/n3P2p/3QB2k/7P/3p2RR/5KPN/4n3

*1...Qf8+ 2.Bxf6#, *1...Qb6+ 2.Bd4#, *1...Qf6+ 2.Bxf6#
1.Rg8? Qxg8!
1.Qxd8? Sc7!
1.Rg7! – 2.g4#, 1...Qf8+ 2.Bf6#, 1...Qb6+ 2.Bd4#, 1...Qxh4+ 2.Bg3#
1...Qf6+ 2.Bxf6#, 1...Qg5 2.hxg5#, 1...Sxg2 2.Qf3#
This is similar to 3rd HM, with a slightly better key, but a clearly worse try, also self-pin is inferior to active pin.
EN <-> RU

5th Honorable mention - No 23, Ingemar Lind (Sweden) bQ4q1/3P4/1P2RP2/RP1PBp2/1K2kP2/1B1p4/2NP3N/8

*1...Q~ 2.B~#, *1...Qf8+ 2.Bd6#
1.Ra4? – 2.K~#, 1...dxc2 2.Kc3#, 1... Bxd5!
1.Ra1? – 2.Re1#, 1...dxc2!
1.Kc3? – 2.Ra4#, 1...Qc8+ 2.Bc7#, 1...Bxd5!
1.Qxa8? zz 1...Qxe6/Qf7 2.dxe6#/d6#, 1...dxc2 2.Bxc2#, 1...Qe8!
1.Qxg8? – 2.Qg2#/Bb8#/Bc7#/Bd6#, 1...Bxd5 2.Qg2#, 1...dxc2!
1.Kc5! – 2.Ra4#, 1...Qg1+ 2.Bd4#, 1...Qf8+ 2.Bd6#, 1...Qc8+ 2.Bc7#
1...Bxd5 2.Bxd5#, 1...dxc2 2.Bxc2#
No 11 and 10 (2nd and 3rd Comm., see below) show that this main variations are possible in Meredith form. But No 23 adds tries with play of additional white batteries, a good attempt to show additional content.
EN <-> RU
6th Hon. mention - No 2 (version)
Vladimir Klipachev
TT-182, SuperProblem, 03-02-2017
q7/3p4/7p/1n1RB2k/8/1p4Q1/P5P1/2R1K3
#2(7+6)
1st Commendation - No 6
Victor Volchek
TT-182, SuperProblem, 24-01-2017
7q/6NR/6pB/8/7k/7p/5K2/1b1B4
#2(5+5)
2nd Commendation - No 11
Dieter Müller
TT-182, SuperProblem, 24-01-2017
1q6/4P1P1/3R4/2pB1pK1/2pk4/2p5/4Q3/8
#2(6+6)

6th Honorable mention - No 2 (version), Vladimir Klipachev (Russia) q7/3p4/7p/1n1RB2k/8/1p4Q1/P5P1/2R1K3

*1...Qa5+ 2.Bc3#
1.Rc4? - 2.Rg4#/Rh4#, 1...Sd4!
1.Kf2! – 2.Rh1#, 1...Qa7+ 2.Bd4#, 1...Qxa2+ 2.Bb2#, 1...Qf8+/Qd8 2.Bf6#
Duel bQ-wB in a light setting. The composer could have added an option try with the same material by Rb1->c1, Pc4->b3: 1.Rc4? Sd4!
EN <-> RU

1st Commendation - No 6, Victor Volchek (Belarus) 7q/6NR/6pB/8/7k/7p/5K2/1b1B4

*1...Qf8+ 2.Bf4#
1.Rxh8? – 2.Bc1#/Bd2#/Be3#/Bf4#, 1...g5!
1.Se6! – 2.Bg5#, 1...Qf6+ 2.Bf4#, 1...Qd4+ 2.Be3#, 1...Qb2+ 2.Bd2#
1...Qf8+ 2.Bxf8#
It’s a pity that D (see Appendix) is a strong forerunner, but No 6 still has some significant improvements: the threat Q:R is less strong, Qf6+ & Qf8+ have different responses, a try is added, and there is a changed set mate. (The composer could have added a better try by +wPc7: 1.c8Q? – 2.Qg4#, 1...Qf8+ 2.Bf4#, 1...Bf5! But he wants a white aristocrat, and that is okay.)
EN <-> RU

2nd Commendation - No 11, Dieter Müller (Germany) 1q6/4P1P1/3R4/2pB1pK1/2pk4/2p5/4Q3/8

*1...Qxd6/c2 2.??
1.Qd1+? Ke5 2.Re6#, 1...Ke3!
1.Qf2+? Ke5 2.Qf4#, 1...Kd3!
1.e8Q? Qd8+!
1.g8Q? – 2.Qg7#, 1...Qxg8+ 2.Bxg8#, 2…Qf8 2.B~#, 1...Qxd6!
1.Kxf5! – 2.Qe4#, 1...Qc8+ 2.Be6#, 1...Qb1+ 2.Be4#, 1...Qf8+ 2.Bf7#
1...c2 2.Qd2#
Duel bQ-wB in Meredith form, but the try has a brutal refutation, moreover Qxd6 is already a strong black threat in set. The composer could have added an option try, with also a better refutation by Pg7->g4: 1.gxf5? c2!
EN <-> RU
3rd Commendation - No 10
Dieter Müller
TT-182, SuperProblem, 24-01-2017
8/2PK4/3p4/1P4Qp/2RBk3/8/q7/4N3
#2*(7+4)
4th Commendation - No 22
Ingemar Lind
TT-182, SuperProblem, 24-01-2017
6q1/3P4/4R3/1Kp1Bp2/4kp2/5p2/3Q4/8
#2(5+6)
5th Commendation - No 20
Valery Shanshin
TT-182, SuperProblem, 24-01-2017
8/4BN2/r5P1/r3RB1k/1P6/1bR4K/7N/8
#2(9+4)

3rd Commendation - No 10, Dieter Müller (Germany) 8/2PK4/3p4/1P4Qp/2RBk3/8/q7/4N3

*1...Qc2 2.Bc3#, *1...d5 2.Qe5#
1.c8S? – 2.Sxd6#, 1...Qa7+ 2.Bxa7#, 1...Qa6/Qa3/Qh2 2.B~#, 1...Qxc4!
1.c8Q? – 2.Re8#, 1...Qa7+ 2.Bxa7#, 1...Qa8/Qh2 2.B~#, 1...Qxc4!
1.Qe3+? Kd5 2.Qe6#, 1...Kf5!
1.Qg4+? Kd5 2.Qe6#, 1...hxg4!
1.Qg6+? Kd5 2.Qe6#, 1...Kf4!
1.Kxd6! – 2.Qe5#, 1...Qh2+ 2.Be5#, 1...Qa3+ 2.Bc5#, 1...Qa6+ 2.Bb6#
The same basic matrix as 2nd Comm, but here is no chance for a better try.
EN <-> RU

4th Commendation - No 22, Ingemar Lind (Sweden) 6q1/3P4/4R3/1Kp1Bp2/4kp2/5p2/3Q4/8

*1...Qb8+ 2.Bxb8#, *1...Qxe6/f2 2.??
1.Qe1+? Kd5 2.Rd6#, 1...Kd3!
1.Qc2+? Kd5 2.Qc4#, 1...Ke3!
1.d8Q? Qe8+!
1.Kc4? Qxe6+!
1.Kxc5! – 2.Qd4#, 1...Qg1+ 2.Bd4#, 1...Qf8+ 2.Bd6#, 1...Qc8+ 2.Bc7#
1...f2 2.Qe2#
This is exactly 2nd Comm., but without the try pawn, thus without any good try. So in this tourney, this is inferior.
EN <-> RU

5th Commendation - No 20, Valery Shanshin (Russia) POS

*1...Bxf7 2.??
1.Sf1? – 2.Sg3#, 1...Rxg6 2.Bg4#, 1...Bxf7!
1.Rg3? – 2.Rg5#, 1...Bxf7!
1.Rc8? – 2.Rh8#, 1...Rxg6 2.Bg4#, 1...Ra8!
1.Kg2! – 2.Rh3#, 1...Ra2+ 2.Bc2#, 1...Bd5+ 2.Be4#, 1...Rxg6+ 2.Bg4#
E (mentioned by composer, not thematic) and F both are partial forerunners. There are some improvements on E and some differences to F, but a higher placement was not possible.
EN <-> RU
Dedicated to the participants
of TT-182
- Valery Shanshin
(after M. Caillaud & P. Murashev)
TT-182, SuperProblem, 03-02-2017
4r3/1P1p4/8/2P1R3/3RBBb1/1K6/2N1k1rn/1n1N1q1Q
#2(10+8)

Dedicated to the participants of TT-182 - Valery Shanshin (after M. Caillaud & P. Murashev)4r3/1P1p4/8/2P1R3/3RBBb1/1K6/2N1k1rn/1n1N1q1Q

*1...Qf3+ 2.Bd3#, *1...Rg3+ 2.Bf3#, *1...Be6+ 2.Bd5#
1.b8Q! – 2.Qb5#, 1...Qf3+ 2.Bd3#, 1...Rg3+ 2.Bf3#, 1...Be6+ 2.Bd5#, 1...Rxb8+ 2.Bb7#
1...S~ 2.Rd2#, 1...Qxd1 2.Qxg2#
Editorial. The problem has 4 thematic variations and was composed by inspiration of 5th Prize (No 30, M. Caillaud) and 2nd Honorable mention (No 7, P. Murashev).
EN <-> RU

Appendix | Приложение

A - Janos Kiss
2nd Prize
“Sakkelet”, 1995
1B6/Kp6/5n2/R3P3/R1Bk4/N4P2/1PqrrP2/1Q1N4
#2(12+6)
B - Fritz Karge
“Die Zeit”
1978
b4n2/5q2/3N1Q1p/4pBp1/5k2/6R1/7P/4K3
#2(6+7)
C - G. S. S. Narayanan
1st Prize
“Northwest Chess”, 1976
1N2Nr2/Q1Kp1p2/4k1r1/R3B3/2p1R3/3P4/8/7q
#2(8+7)

A - Janos Kiss 1B6/Kp6/5n2/R3P3/R1Bk4/N4P2/1PqrrP2/1Q1N4

*1...b5 2.??
1.Bc7? – 2.Bb6#, 1...Sd5/Se4/Sd7 2.Rxd5#, 1...Qb3/Qxb2 2.Bxb3#, 1...Rxe5 2.Bxe5#, 1...b5!
1.Bd6? – 2.Sb5#, 1...Qxc4 2.Rxc4#, 1...Rxe5 2.Bxe5#, 1...Qb3/Qxb2 2.Bxb3#, 1...Qxa4!
1.Kxb7! – 2.Ba7#, 1...Qe4+ 2.Bd5#, 1...Qh7+ 2.Bf7#, 1...Qb3+/Qxb2+ 2.Bxb3#, 1...Sd5/Se4/Sd7 2.Rxd5#, 1...Rxe5 2.Bxe5#

B - Fritz Karge b4n2/5q2/3N1Q1p/4pBp1/5k2/6R1/7P/4K3

1.Sxf7? – 2.Qxe5#/Bb1#/Bc2#/Bd3#/Bh7#/Bg6#, 1...Bf3/Be4 2.Qxe5#, 1...Sd7!
1.Ke2! – 2.Rg4#, 1...Qa2+ 2.Bc2#, 1...Qc4+ 2.Bd3#, 1...Qh5+ 2.Bg4#, 1...h5 2.Qxg5#, 1...Bf3+ 2.Rxf3#

C - G. S. S. Narayanan 1N2Nr2/Q1Kp1p2/4k1r1/R3B3/2p1R3/3P4/8/7q

*1...Ke7 2.Bf6#/Bd6#, *1...Kf5 2.Bd6#, *1...f6/f5 2.??
1.Kb6! – 2.Qxd7#, 1...Qg1+ 2.Bd4#, 1...Qb1+ 2.Bb2#, 1...Ke7+ 2.Bf6#, 1...Kf5+ 2.Bd6#
D - Ivan Gegelski
“Shakhmaty w SSSR”
1956
8/8/8/8/4Q2K/8/2n5/qRBk4
#2(4+3)
E - Jorge M. Kapros
“La Prensa”
1975
1q3N1b/2pRQ3/Ppk1Kn2/8/b1B5/2R1B3/8/1rr5
#2(8+9)
F - Erkki Paalanen
1st Prize
“Suomen Shakki”, 1932
b7/8/1r5p/3pRB1k/5P1p/4N2K/8/b3B2R
#2(7+7)

D - Ivan Gegelski 8/8/8/8/4Q2K/8/2n5/qRBk4

*1...Qh8+ 2.Bh6#, 1...Qf6+ 2.Bg5#, 1...Qxb1/Se3 2.??
1.Qg2! – 2.Qd2#, 1...Qf6+ 2.Bg5#, 1...Qh8+ 2.Bh6#, 1...Qd4+/Qa4+ 2.Bf4#, 1...Ke1 2.Bd2#, 1...Qc3/Qa5 2.B~#

E - Jorge M. Kapros 1q3N1b/2pRQ3/Ppk1Kn2/8/b1B5/2R1B3/8/1rr5

1.Kf5! – 2.Qe6#, 1...Rb5+ 2.Bd5#, 1...Bc2+ 2.Bd3#, 1...Rf1+ 2.Bxf1#, 1...Qxf8/Qe8 2.Rxc7#, 1...Se4/Se8 2.Qxe4#, 1...Rd1 2.Bf1#/Be2#/Bd3#

F - Erkki Paalanen b7/8/1r5p/3pRB1k/5P1p/4N2K/8/b3B2R

1.Rg1? – 2.Bg6#, 1...Bxe5!
1.Kg2! – 2.Rxh4#, 1...Rg6+ 2.Bg4#, 1...Rb2+ 2.Bc2#, 1...d4+ 2.Be4#, 1...h3+ 2.Rxh3#


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Sections | Разделы

#2 (twomovers | двухходовки)

Participants | Участники

Armeni A. – No 4, 5, 21
Caillaud M. – No 29, 30, 31*
Halma M. – No 25
Klipachev V. – No 2, 3
Kostyukov A. – No 27
Kuhn R. – No 13A*, 13B*, 13C*, 14*
Labai Z. – No 24*
Lind I. – No 22, 23
Müller D. – No 9, 10, 11, 12, 13A*, 13B*, 13C*, 14*
Murashev P. – No 7, 8
Navon E. – No 32
Novitsky P. – No 1
Retter Y. – No 26
Shanshin V. – No 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 31*
Tar G. – No 24*
Tominić I. – No 28
Volchek V. – No 6

The Winners | Победители

Michel Caillaud

Valery Shanshin
Congratulations! | Поздравляем!

Judge | Арбитр

Aleksey Oganesjan
e-mail: alexeioganesyan@gmail.com

Director and editor
Директор и редактор

Aleksey Oganesjan
e-mail: alexeioganesyan@gmail.com

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