Final Award in Quick Composing TT-138 | Окончательные итоги блицконкурса TT-138

Direct Duplex | Прямой дуплекс

Theme | Тема

13 entries were received from 8 authors representing 5 countries | На конкурс поступило 13 композиций от 8 авторов из 5 стран

EN <-> RU

I received 13 problems in anonymous form for this tourney.
The number of entries was perhaps not so large, but I think the overall quality was very good. The theme, "Direct Duplex" is not such an easy theme, but there were several very interesting implementations of it, and all problems definitely had their merits. Therefore, I finally decided that the most fair thing to do was to include all problems in the award.
My main criterias when judging have been the following:
- Good balance between the white and black variants. That is, if for example the white variant is excellent, but the black variant is poor, the overall impression is generally not so good. Compare to an ordinary problem with two twins: if one twin is poor, it does not make much sense;
- Good use of the material. Preferably, most main pieces should come to good use in both the white and black variants;
- The difficulty level of the problem's theme. Above all, I have given special consideration to the few problems with more that 2 moves, as this theme is far more difficult to implement in #N problems;
- The overall artistic effect;
- Some type of common element in the two variants is a most welcome asset.
It was not easy to judge – above all, I found it hard to determine the order between the Prize winners - but I finally decided on the following:

Award is the following | Отличия распределились следующим образом

1st Prize, 1st Place - No 3
Karol Mlynka
TT-138, SuperProblem, 18-05-2015
kB6/1pRNp3/1P2P3/3b3R/3p2P1/1q3BpK/5b1P/2rQn3
#2duplex(11+10)
2nd Prize, 2nd Place - No 1
Yury Gorbatenko
TT-138, SuperProblem, 18-05-2015
3R1R1B/4N3/b1pPkPpp/4n3/1p2K1P1/3pbp1p/3P2P1/6q1
#2duplex(10+12)
3rd Prize, 3rd Place - No 5
Karol Mlynka
TT-138, SuperProblem, 18-05-2015
8/2r3pP/kP1p4/NpP5/1P2P1Pp/4p2K/5b1B/q3n3
#3duplex(9+10)

1st Prize, 1st Place - No 3, Karol Mlynka (Slovakia)

white:
1.Rh8! – 2.Ba7#, 1...Qxf3 (A) 2.Qa4#, 1...Bxe6 (B) 2.Bxb7#, 1...Rxc7 2.Bxc7#, 1...Qxb6 2.Sxb6#
black:
1.g2! – 2.g1S#, 1...Qxe1 2.Qxf3# (A), 1...g5 2.Bxe6# (B)
This is, in my opinion, an excellent rendering of the theme. Several different variants and mates in both variants, including line openings and interferences, pin mates, a minor promotion, and last but not least - the reoccurring black moves in the white and black variants, with quite different purpose. This is what really separates this problem from most of the others.
Also, the author has managed to make several pieces of both colors play important roles in both variants.
The only clear drawback is the key in the black variant, which is quite obvious and also takes a flight – but otherwise, this problem feels almost flawless, in consideration of the difficult theme. Congratulations to a well deserved 1st Prize!
EN <-> RU

2nd Prize, 2nd Place - No 1, Yury Gorbatenko (Russia)

white:
1.Sf5! – 2.Sg7#, 1...Sd7 2.Rde8#, 1...gxf5+ 2.gxf5#, 1...Sf7 2.Rfe8#
black:
1.Sc4! – 2.Sxd2#, 1...dxe3 2.Qxe3#, 1...Kxd3 2.Qb1#, 1...Kxf3 2.Qxg2#
This problem was another one of my biggest favorites. The main reason is, that here, both the white and black variants definitely have solutions well worthy a "real" #2 problem. The white solution has a nice, sacrifical key, and two black self-blocks connected with line interferences, and the black solution has an excellent key, giving 2 flights. Both variants have several nice variants and mates, and all pieces of the attacking side come to good use.
The drawback is, that the two variants are not as well interlaced as the variants in the 1st prize entry. Almost all pieces of the defending side are very static in both variants, and therefore don't make much sense there. But nevertheless, this is also an excellent rendering of the theme, and well worth a prize!
EN <-> RU

3rd Prize, 3rd Place - No 5, Karol Mlynka (Slovakia)

white:
1.h8Q! – 2.Qa8+ Ra7 3.Qxa7#
1...Ra7 (a) 2.Qc8+ (A) Rb7 3.Qxb7#, 1...dxc5 (b) 2.Bxc7 (B) cxb4 3.Qa8#
black:

1.Qd1? Bg3! 1.Qf6! – 2.Qf3+ Bg3 3.Qxg3#
1...Bf4 (c) 2.Qxf4 (C) – 3.Qg3#; 1...Bg3 (d) 2.Bxg3 (D) – 3.Qf1#, 2...g5 3.Qe6#
My favorite among the entries with more than 2 moves. Nice consistency between the white and black variants, with radical change in 2 variants each. Also a good try in the black variant.
The actual play, though, is in my opinion not quite as interesting as in the 1st and 2nd prize entries, and the white key is rather obvious. Nevertheless, it is very good for being a #3 Duplex problem, and yet another well worthy prize winner!
EN <-> RU
1st Honorable mention - No 10
Sergey Abramenko
TT-138, SuperProblem, 18-05-2015
r3k3/1p1p1pB1/1P1P1P2/6R1/3Pp3/2p1Pp2/n1Pr1P1P/1b2K2R
#5duplex(12+11)
2nd Honorable mention - No 2
Aleksey Oganesjan
TT-138, SuperProblem, 18-05-2015
7k/2pp1B1p/1P5P/B3P3/8/1p1p1bpp/P1PP4/4K2R
#2duplex(10+9)
3rd Honorable mention - No 4
Karol Mlynka
TT-138, SuperProblem, 18-05-2015
3N4/p1B5/kP6/6pn/PppPbpP1/1q3BpK/5b1P/3Qn3
#2duplex(10+12)

1st Honorable mention - No 10, Sergey Abramenko (Russia)

white:
1.Re5+ Kd8 2.Rh5! Rd1+ 3.Kxd1 Bxc2+ 4.Ke1! – 5.Rh8#, 2...Re2+ 3.Kf1! Rf2+ 4.Kxf2 – 5.Rh8#
black:
1.Re2+ Kf1 2.Rxc2! Re5+ 3.Kd8 Re8+ 4.Kxe8 – 5.Rc1#
This entry is as much as a #5, with lots of pieces! A very difficult task, but I think the author has handled it quite well. Very consistent play in both variants, which start with removing the opponent's right to castle, and then avoiding all incoming checks. The play is perhaps not too complicated, and the keys maybe not the best, but as stated before, the problem wins several bonus points on the difficulty of the task. Very good!
EN <-> RU

2nd Honorable mention - No 2, Aleksey Oganesjan (Russia)

white:
1.bxc7? – 2.c8Q(R)#, 1...Bb7!
1.Bc3! – 2.e6#, 1...d5 2.exd6 e.p.#
black:
1.bxc2/dxc2? – 2.c1Q(R)#, 1...Bb3!
1.b2! – 2.b1Q(R)#, 1...0-0 2.h2#
A Valladao task in a Duplex #2 is a most respectable achievement!
The play is rather simple, but the two consistent tries add some bonus points to it. Nice!
EN <-> RU

3rd Honorable mention - No 4, Karol Mlynka (Slovakia)

white:
1.b7! – 2.b8S#, 1...Qxa4 (a) 2.Qxa4# (A), 1...Bxb7 (b) 2.Bxb7# (B)
black:
*1...Bxf4 (c) 2.Sxf4# (C), 1...Be2 (Bg2) (d) 2.Bg2# (D)
1.g2! – 2.g1S#, 1...Qxe1 (e) 2.Qxf3# (E), 1...gxh5 (f) 2.Bf5# (F)
This problem closely resembles the 1st prize winner. It has some nice features that the 1st prize does not, for example double minor promotions, and a black key that does not take a flight. However, it is missing the nice touch with the reoccurring black moves, and this lowers the overall effect a bit.
Maybe I would have ranked this problem a bit higher, if it was not for the 1st prize, but still, it is good enough for an Honorable Mention.
EN <-> RU
4th Honorable mention - No 6
Vladimir Koci
TT-138, SuperProblem, 18-05-2015
8/3P4/ppp1N3/k5p1/P5nq/KnP5/RP6/3bR3
#2duplex(8+9)
No 6A
Vladimir Koci (version Ingemar Lind)
TT-138, SuperProblem, 18-05-2015
8/8/ppp1N2p/k5B1/P5nr/KnPp4/PP6/1b1q4
#2duplex(7+11)
1st Commendation - No 12
Ilija Serafimović
TT-138, SuperProblem, 18-05-2015
5N1k/5p1P/7K/6P1/8/5b2/1p6/8
#2duplex(4+4)

4th Honorable mention - No 6, Vladimir Koci (Czech Republic)

white:
1.Sd8? – 2.Sb7#/Sxc6#, 1...b5!
1.Sd4? – 2.Sc6#/Sb3#, 1...b5 2.d8Q(B)#, 1...Sxd4 2.b4#, 1...Bd3 2.Sxb3#, 1...Qh1(h6)!
1.Sc5! – 2.Sb7#, 1...Sxc5 2.b4#, 1...b5/bxc5 2.d8Q(B)#
black:
1.Se5? – 2.Qxa4#/Sc4#, 1...c4/Sc5/Sd4/Sf4 2.Sc4#, 1...Ra1/Rxd1 2.Qxa4#, 1...Rxd5+!
1.Se3! – 2.Qxa4#/Sc4#, 1...c4/Sc5/Sd4/Sf4 2.Sxc4#, 1...Rxd1/Rxe3/Ra1 2.Qxa4#
This problem has a very interesting white solution, including a good try, but a worse black one, with a double threat that can't be fully parried, and an obvious key, considering that white threatens a check on e5 in the starting position. Besides, the white rook on a2 is playing a very passive role. The author could also easily have improved the try 1.Sd4? in the white variant, for example by adding black pawns on g6 and h3, in order to get a unique setback.
Nevertheless, I think the play is quite good for a Direct Duplex problem, and therefore, it is at least worthy of an Honorable mention.

When I looked at this problem, my first thought was that it must have much higher potential than what was seen in this variant. There just had to be more to make out of this idea.
So, I started working with it, and found this improvement:
EN <-> RU

No 6A, Vladimir Koci (version Ingemar Lind)

white:
1.Sd8? – 2.Sb7#, 1...Sc5 2.b4#, 1...b5! (2.Bd8??)
1.Sd4? – 2.Sxc6#, 1...Bf3/Sxd4/b5 2.Sxb3/b4/Bd8#, 1...Se5!
1.Sc5! – 2.Sb7#, 1...Sxc5/bxc5 2.b4/Bd8#
black:
1.Sd2? – 2.Qxa4/Sc4#, 1...Bxd2/Sc5/b3 2.Qxa4/Sc4/Qc1#, 1...b4+!
1.Se5? – 2.Rxa4/Sc4#, 1...axb3!
1.Se3! – 2.Rxa4/Sc4#, 1...Sd4/Bxe3/axb3 2.Sc4/Rxa4/Sc2#
This version would definitely have placed among the very first in this tourney – most likely, I would have awarded it a 1st prize - so I feel a bit sorry, that the author didn't manage to find the full potential of this fine idea.
EN <-> RU

1st Commendation - No 12, Ilija Serafimović (Serbia)

white:
1.g6! – 2.g7#, 1...fxg6 2.Sxg6#
black:
1.b1Q! – 2.Qh1#, 1...g6 2.Qc1#, 1...Sg6+ 2.Qxg6#
Very good economy, and some nice, different mates. Simple but charming!
EN <-> RU
2nd Commendation - No 8
Pavel Arestov
TT-138, SuperProblem, 18-05-2015
Q3R3/p5pr/3PPPk1/1p2p1Pp/3qP2P/p2pp3/Pb6/1K6
#2duplex(10+12)
3rd Commendation - No 7
Pietro Pitton
TT-138, SuperProblem, 18-05-2015
8/8/4n3/8/3N1p1p/5P1k/5Pp1/6K1
#2duplex(4+5)
4th Commendation - No 13
Ilija Serafimović
TT-138, SuperProblem, 18-05-2015
B7/2RP3b/5ppb/3p1N1p/1p3p2/2PkPK1p/8/BN5n
#2duplex(9+11)

2nd Commendation - No 8, Pavel Arestov (Russia)

white:
1.Re7? gxf6! 1.Qb7? gxf6!
1.Re8-g8! – 2.Qe8#, 1...Rh6/Rh8 2.Rxg7#, 1...Qxe4 2.Qxe4#
black:
1.Ba1? Kc1!
1.Bb2-c1! – 2.Qb2#, 1...Kxc1 2.Qa1#
Some nice tries and play, but does not feel perfectly balanced. The black variant is a bit simple.
EN <-> RU

3rd Commendation - No 7, Pietro Pitton (Italy)

white:
1.Sxe6? pat 1.Se2! S~ 2.Sxf4#
black:
1.Sxd4? pat 1.Sg5! S~ 2.Sxf3#
Very consistent play, with mutual zugzwang and stalemate avoidance. A little too simple for a higher placement, though.
EN <-> RU

4th Commendation - No 13, Ilija Serafimović (Serbia)

white:
1.cxb4! – 2.Rc3#, 1...d4 2.Be4#
black:
1.g5! – 2.g4#, 1...Sxh6 2.Be4#
Bishop mates on e4 by both sides – nice!
The economy does not feel optimal, though, with lots of static pieces. Above all, the bishop on a1 is completely superfluous. The white key could probably also be better.
EN <-> RU
5th Commendation - No 11
Sergey Abramenko
TT-138, SuperProblem, 18-05-2015
8/8/4p3/8/p1p5/k1P2P2/p1P5/K7
#5duplex(4+5)
No 11A
Sergey Abramenko (version Ingemar Lind)
TT-138, SuperProblem, 18-05-2015
8/4p3/7p/8/p1p4P/k1P5/p1P2P2/K7
#6duplex(5+6)
6th Commendation - No 9
Pavel Arestov
TT-138, SuperProblem, 18-05-2015
8/p1pP4/1pP5/kp6/1N6/Kpp5/8/2n5
#2duplex(4+8)

5th Commendation - No 11, Sergey Abramenko (Russia)

white:
1.f4! zz 1...e5 2.f5!
(2.fxe5? pat) 2...e4 3.f6 e3 4.f7 e2 5.f8Q#
black:
1.e5! zz 1...f4 2.e4!
(2.exf4? pat) 2...f5 3.e3 f6 4.e2 f7 5.e1Q#
Another #5 problem. Very consistent play, but much too mechanical for being really interesting.

An easy improvement is the following:
EN <-> RU

No 11A, Sergey Abramenko (version Ingemar Lind)

white:
1.f4! e6 2.h5 e5 3.f5
etc.
black:
1.e5! f3 2.h5 f4 3.e4
etc.
Now, we get a double excelsior, and a double tempo move.
EN <-> RU

6th Commendation - No 9, Pavel Arestov (Russia)

white:
1.d8S! – 2.Sb7#
black:
1.b2! – 2.b1S#
Double minor promotions in a Meredith. A little too forced, though, for being really interesting. Also, the black pawn on c7 is superfluous.
EN <-> RU
No 13A
Ilija Serafimović (version)
TT-138, SuperProblem, 04-06-2015
B1n3b1/5N2/2pP2p1/1p2P3/1BkPK2n/4P1b1/1RP5/8
#2duplex(10+8)

No 13A, Ilija Serafimović (version)

white:
1.Bd2! – 2.Rb4#, 1...Sxd6+ 2.Sxd6#, 1...c5 2.Bd5#

black:
1.g5! – 2.Bh7#, 1...Sxg5/Sh6/Sh8 2.Bd5#
No 3A
Karol Mlynka (version)
TT-138, SuperProblem, 29-08-2015
kB6/1pRNp3/1P2P3/3b3R/3p2PP/1q3BpK/5b1P/2rQn3
#2duplex(12+10)

No 3A, Karol Mlynka (version)

white:
1...Bxf3 2.Ra5#
1.Rh8! – 2.Ba7#, 1...Qxf3 (A) 2.Qa4#, 1...Bxe6 (B) 2.Bxb7#, 1...Rxc7 2.Bxc7#, 1...Qxb6 2.Sxb6#
black:
1...Be2 2.Bg2#
1.g2! – 2.g1S#, 1...Qxe1 2.Qxf3# (A), 1...g5 2.Bxe6# (B)
Set play was added.
EN <-> RU

Finally, I would like to thank all participants for all their fine entries, and last but not least, I would like to thank the SuperProblem tourney director Aleksey Oganesjan for giving me the opportunity to judge this tourney.
Thank you all, and congratulations to the winners!


URL address of this web page | Адрес этой страницы http://superproblem.ru/htm/tourneys/quick-tt/results/tt-138_award.html


Sections | Разделы

#2 (twomovers | двухходовки)
#3 (threemovers | трёхходовки)
#N (moremovers | многоходовки)

Participants | Участники

Abramenko S. – No 10, 11
Arestov P. – No 8, 9
Gorbatenko Y. – No 1
Koci V. – No 6
Mlynka K. – No 3, 4, 5
Oganesjan A. – No 2
Pitton P. – No 7
Serafimović I. – No 12, 13

The Winner Is | Победитель

Karol Mlynka
Congratulations! | Поздравляем!

Judge | Арбитр

Ingemar Lind

Translation | Перевод

Aleksey Oganesjan

Editor | Редактор

Aleksey Oganesjan
e-mail: alexeioganesyan@gmail.com